Shalini Ganendra Fine Art

ZEFREY THROWELL

 

b.1975  USA

 

Zefrey Throwell is an artist living and working in New York City. A self-proclaimed ‘troublemaker’, Throwell uses film, painting and performance to convey his vision of modern America and the failure of communication in our age. He has been active in art circles since 2003, and is a member of three collectives: THROWHITE, Red76 and Cameracartell. In addition he co-directs a gallery called Engineer’s Office Gallery in the heart of Rockefeller Center.

 

High-impact visuals surge through Throwell’s paintings, photographs, films and projects. In an interview with the BBC, Throwell explained that his artistic perspective is shaped by the words of the Serbian artist Marina Abramovic ‘If you’re not doing anything remarkable, why do you expect anyone to care?’ His own brand of art harnesses the power of movement and colour, as well as the unexpected and the shocking to focus public attention on hard-hitting issues that trouble our modern world, addressing themes of addiction, isolation and economic injustice.

 

During his time at SGFA, Zefrey has been working on his up-coming documentary film ‘Bumi Yorker’, which explores ideas of ‘Bumiputera’ and what it means to be ‘truly Malaysian’ in the modern day. Zefrey will then compare this to notions of what it means to be a ‘true New Yorker’. He has spent his time in Malaysia meeting with and interviewing over 80 Malaysian residents representing a range of cultures, economic backgrounds and geographic spaces.

Biography and Awards

 

Throwell was included in the 2007, 2009 and 2011 Venice Biennales. He has had recent shows at the Museum of Modern Art (2011), Leopold Hoesch Musuem in Germany (2012), Whitney Museum of American Art (2010), Queens Museum of Art (2010), the Guggenheim Museum in New York (2009), Studio Museum in New York (2009) and projects at Werkstatt der Kulturen in Berlin (2010) and Photo Miami (2009). In addition Throwell’s project Ocularpation: Wall Street received international attention for its critique of Wall Street and was featured heavily in the New York Times as well as CNN, NBC, Artforum, Art in America and served as an inspiration for the Occupy Wall Street movement. Throwell has work in the MOMA and the Hall collections, in addition to numerous private collections.

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